Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Goose Creek, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Goose Creek, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

Service Areas

 Eye Surgeon Goose Creek, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

 Eye Doctor Goose Creek, SC

What is an Ophthalmologist in Goose Creek, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Goose Creek, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Goose Creek, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Goose Creek, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Goose Creek, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Goose Creek, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Goose Creek, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Goose Creek, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

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Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

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Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

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Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Goose Creek, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

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Latest News in Goose Creek, SC

City of Goose Creek kicks off goose statue scavenger hunt

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Families with students on spring break might be looking for something to do. In this Lowcountry city, they can now go on a wild goose chase – literally.Last year, the City of Goose Creek Recreation Department partnered with the Goose Creek Artists Guild to start the City’s “Adopt a Goose” Program. Since then, 21 different local businesses in Goose Creek have adopted their very ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Families with students on spring break might be looking for something to do. In this Lowcountry city, they can now go on a wild goose chase – literally.

Last year, the City of Goose Creek Recreation Department partnered with the Goose Creek Artists Guild to start the City’s “Adopt a Goose” Program. Since then, 21 different local businesses in Goose Creek have adopted their very own statues.

Each business got creative direction to work with members of the artist guild to design unique and individualized goose statues that will then make their nests with their owners.

To both push this initiative of supporting local artists and shine spotlights on local businesses, the City created a scavenger hunt to find these four-and-a-half-foot tall statues.

Starting Saturday, Goose Creek residents can grab a map and start snapping pictures with each goose statue and try to find them all. Officials say participants can share those pictures with the City by tagging them @cityofgoosecreek and @cityofgoosecreekrecreation on Instagram or at the City of Goose Creek and Goose Creek Recreation Facebook pages using the hashtags #FollowTheFlock and #GCGooseChase.

Here’s how to join in on the fun:

This isn’t all, though. Officials have prepared an additional incentive for students on spring break all week.

Starting Monday and going through Friday, three random goose statues will “lay” a golden egg. Inside are prizes such as gifts and coupons from local businesses.

The City has a full list of all goose statues, ranging from Sgt. McGoose at John McCants Veterans Park to Goosetavo over at E-Z Auto of Goose Creek, listed on its website. Make sure to check hours for some locations as certain geese are nested inside.

Businesses who are interested in acquiring their own goose statue can find more information here.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek barber college marks history in Palmetto State

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - One Goose Creek barber college is making an impact on both hair and history.Even at 82 years old, Howard Boyd is built for barbering. You could say it’s in his blood. Boyd’s father, a barber, was his first teacher.“He used to cut hair on the porch—front porch and he was telling me how to cut his hair,” Boyd said. “So, I ended up cutting his hair and he turned the clippers over to me and said, ‘Hey, you need to—you can take it from here. You can have it.&...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCSC) - One Goose Creek barber college is making an impact on both hair and history.

Even at 82 years old, Howard Boyd is built for barbering. You could say it’s in his blood. Boyd’s father, a barber, was his first teacher.

“He used to cut hair on the porch—front porch and he was telling me how to cut his hair,” Boyd said. “So, I ended up cutting his hair and he turned the clippers over to me and said, ‘Hey, you need to—you can take it from here. You can have it.’”

Beyond that feeling of a fresh fade, it’s Boyd’s legacy that will live on. He’s the founder of the first Black-owned barber college in the state of South Carolina.

“It was just a three-bedroom building which we stayed. My family lived here. That was the kitchen. And right downstairs here, which is the garage carport, we were able to start the garage barbershop,” Boyd said.

Since its founding in 1986, Goose Creek Barber & Styling College, which is now Howard’s Barber & Styling College, has trained about one thousand students, according to Boyd.

“Just the work I’ve done speaks for me,” he said.

Former students like Jessie Washington, Kenyatta Grimmage and Jermaine Scott have all gone through the college and have made barbering an integral part of their own lives.

“In 1996, I was able to open the first female, African-American barbershop in Goose Creek, South Carolina,” Jessie Washington said. “I’d just like to thank Mr. Howard for having the vision to help others.”

“We give free haircuts at the College of Charleston, where you know, I’m the Associate Director of Admissions down there,” Grimmage said, who also happens to be Boyd’s son-in-law. “We do a program called Cuts and Conversations where we have conversations with young men.”

“It was like how can I step up my game and be like this guy whose name just rings bells throughout the whole community?” Scott said.

Washington, Grimmage and Scott are now instructors at Howard’s Barber & Styling College, working alongside Boyd to teach the next generation of hair artists and entrepreneurs.

“It’s work. Work. You have to continue to work. You have to have a passion for it. You know it’s nonstop, when it’s good or when it’s bad,” Boyd laughed. “But you still work. You keep the faith and it works out. Trust me.”

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek's traffic light project delayed, now set for February completion

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — A much-needed addition on a road in Goose Creek has taken longer than expected, and the work is still not done.The project would bring a traffic light to a very busy intersection of Myers Road and Saint James Avenue.Goose Creek Mayor Gregory Habib said he’s wanted to see a light here for years to slow down drivers.“Why it has taken 19 months to get a light up, I don’t know,” said Habib.Read more: ...

GOOSE CREEK, S.C. (WCIV) — A much-needed addition on a road in Goose Creek has taken longer than expected, and the work is still not done.

The project would bring a traffic light to a very busy intersection of Myers Road and Saint James Avenue.

Goose Creek Mayor Gregory Habib said he’s wanted to see a light here for years to slow down drivers.

“Why it has taken 19 months to get a light up, I don’t know,” said Habib.

Read more: "White dust emitted into Goose Creek from Century Aluminum plant; officials respond."

A safety project from 2022 is still in the works.

“I know that we’ve asked for that light since 2018 when I became the mayor," Habib said. “The number of accidents at Myers Road and 176 is a significant amount. They tend to be often a very violent accident because of the speeds on 17g,” he added.

Habib said in spring 2022, the South Carolina Department of Transportation told the city that the traffic light would take 15 months to complete. Meaning it would be finished around July 2023.

But an updated timeline has the light turning on in early February of this year.

“I do not work for the Department of Transportation; I’m the mayor of the city of Goose Creek Mayor,” Habib said. “I don’t know why things take as long as they take."

Read more: "Goose Creek Library to celebrate Hawaiian culture with hula dance class."

But despite the slow movement with this project, Habib said the Department of Transporation has helped in other ways.

“They were very proactive with the median project in Saint James, recognizing the number of accidents that have been occurring there, and thankfully for that median project accidents on 176 in that area are less than half of what they were prior,” he said.

A number he hopes to see drop even more when the stoplights are up and helping direct drivers down the busy road.

News 4 reached out to the Department of Transportation to hear more about the status of the project but has yet to be connected with a representative.

‘Alumina dust’ plant emissions concern Goose Creek community

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is now investigating complaints about a white dust produced by an aluminum plant that has caused complaints and worries for Goose Creek residents.Alumina dust is a gritty substance people who live near the Mount Holly Century Aluminum Plant say coats vehicles, plants, mailboxes and anything else outside in areas across Goose Creek. It is produced during the smelting process but is not supposed to leave the plant, a problem DHEC is now looking i...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control is now investigating complaints about a white dust produced by an aluminum plant that has caused complaints and worries for Goose Creek residents.

Alumina dust is a gritty substance people who live near the Mount Holly Century Aluminum Plant say coats vehicles, plants, mailboxes and anything else outside in areas across Goose Creek. It is produced during the smelting process but is not supposed to leave the plant, a problem DHEC is now looking into.

The Mount Holly aluminum smelter has been operating for more than 40 years. But some neighbors say it is recent emissions from the plant that they’re not getting answers about, making them worry about their health.

“It looks like someone has taken baby powder and just shook it all over the cars,” Jackie Davis Pfister, who lives in Goose Creek, says. “It’s gritty. It’s baking into our cars.”

Davis Pfister says this entire process has just been a nightmare and says she’s not the only one who is frustrated. There are multiple posts on Facebook that have garnered hundreds of comments about the same thing.

“It needs to be more addressed than it has been,” Goose Creek resident Marilyn Leegette says. “I wish DHEC would send out some kind of hazard report so people can make themselves educated about what this can do to them.”

DHEC confirmed agents have been to the facility and in the community to gather information as part of their investigation. They say they are working closely with the facility to develop an immediate corrective action plan.

Jonathan Brown, Century Aluminum’s Environmental, Health, and Safety Manager, confirmed that Century believes the emissions may be caused by an unusual failure in the plant’s baghouse. The plant is not 100% sure of the reason for the failure, but are looking at two potential possibilities. One is that a recent change of suppliers for the filters in the baghouse took place, and Century knows that on three occasions a very small portion of the bags failed. The second possibility is recent episodes of high pressure in the bag house.

Brown says Century is working diligently to address these emission issues.

On Monday, Century confirmed they had four “events.” One happened on Sept. 3, two on Sept. 16 and another on Sept. 30. Century says the issue will be fixed by Oct. 17.

But those in the community are worried about their health with some people reporting problems like rashes and difficulty breathing.

“It’s very concerning for me,” Leegette says. “I believe honestly that if there are short-term effects that are showing, there has got to be long-term effects as well.”

“If we could just know what type of air we’re breathing: Is it dangerous to us? I think we just want to know the answer,” Davis Pfister says.

DHEC says alumina dust is not considered a hazardous substance. The particle size of the dust being seen in the community is large and therefore too big to enter human lungs; however, it can still irritate skin, eyes, and the nose, and can be a respiratory irritant after prolonged exposure.

DHEC has also deployed portable air sensors in the area to measure any smaller, breathable particulate matter, called “fine particulate matter.”

DHEC says it’s important to know that the data will represent all particulate matter in the area, not just from a single source or single facility. There can be many different sources of particulate matter emissions within an area. The data from these sensors will help the agency identify any air quality trends in the community.

After an inquiry into the issue, the city of Goose Creek set up a town hall meeting with Century Aluminum and DHEC representatives for Monday at 6 p.m. at City Hall. Mayor Greg Habib will moderate this discussion, which will include questions from attendees. Experts in toxicology, air quality and public health from DHEC will join Century Aluminum leaders who will discuss the issue of excess emissions at the plant, and the plan to fix this problem.

Century says they have set up a website where residents should report their personal situation. They can also call a hotline number at 312-696-3131.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Goose Creek restaurant, market a beacon for city’s Brazilian community

The food sold at multiple Brazilian markets in Goose Creek provide Brazilians with a taste of their home. Their meaning goes beyond the produce and butchered-to-order meats.Establishments like Sky Market Brazilian Restaurant and Bakery, which opened in November 2022, serve as gathering places for South Carolina residents of Brazilian descent, many of whom speak their native Portuguese and not English. Markets are where Brazilians residing here start to build th...

The food sold at multiple Brazilian markets in Goose Creek provide Brazilians with a taste of their home. Their meaning goes beyond the produce and butchered-to-order meats.

Establishments like Sky Market Brazilian Restaurant and Bakery, which opened in November 2022, serve as gathering places for South Carolina residents of Brazilian descent, many of whom speak their native Portuguese and not English. Markets are where Brazilians residing here start to build the friendships and community that will become key to their lives in the U.S.

This makes them a pillar of the local community, said Morgan Bezerra, one of two women behind Smart News, a Goose Creek-based online news outlet that has published stories about South Carolina's Brazilian community in Portuguese, Spanish and English since launching in January.

Markets are a place where Brazilians can gather and find the products they have been missing, said Bezerra, who moved to South Carolina from Brazil in 2001. Whether they have been gone for one month or more than two decades, like Bezerra, Brazilians will always crave the connection and camaraderie they have been able to find at Sky Market, she said.

Born in Minas Gerais, Brazil, Sky Market co-owner Olinto Abrantes immigrated to the U.S. with his family during his childhood. In 2002, they settled in New Hampshire, home to a growing Brazilian population, much like the Boston area and town of Goose Creek.

Abrantes and longtime friend and business partner Felix Simonato eventually decided to move to South Carolina, where the climate felt more like home. They started a construction company, skills that came in handy when they found a vacant stand-alone building on South Goose Creek Boulevard. Once home to a derelict dive bar, the space required extensive renovations that took over 14 months.

Coming from the Northeast, Abrantes and Simonato were inspired by the quality Brazilian bakeries that dot the New England region.

“They have a bunch of bakeries up there. There’s a lot of Portuguese and Brazilian people — the community’s huge,” Abrantes said. “We came from there, so we see the opportunity to bring a good bakery down here.”

Though Sky Market's pastry chefs are churning out guava cookies (casadinho), sponge cakes named after well-known Brazilian beauty queen Marta Rocha and other treats, this approachable establishment is much more than a bakery; it's a full-service restaurant serving food from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

Sky Market invites diners in for breakfast platters in the morning and fried beef jerky turnovers, sausage sandwiches and house-ground burgers on house-made buns later in the day. One emerging favorite on the lunch and dinner menu, Abrantes said, is the Rocket Burger, piled high with mozzarella, ham, bacon and a fried egg.

More than a business

Abrantes and Simonato aren’t the only Brazilian natives operating food and beverage establishments in Goose Creek.

Several Brazilian restaurants and businesses are concentrated in and around the Red Bank corridor, a section of the city that some believe could become the next Park Circle.

Mama’s Bakery & Restaurant opened in this now-vibrant part of Goose Creek in March 2022. Just over a mile away, Brazilian bakery and restaurant Delicias de Minas serves classic Brazilian dishes, savory stuffed pastries fried in wheat dough, sandwiches, sweet treats and an assortment of fresh juice such as graviola, known as soursop or the Brazilian paw paw. Heading southbound from Delicias de Minas, you’ll run into Brazilian steakhouse Chão Goiano.

When it comes to markets, Vitoria International Meat Market — which has locations in Lynn, Peabody, Revere and a handful of other Massachusetts towns — opened this year at 1230 Red Bank Road. Nearby, Brazilian Market operates at 225 Red Bank Road.

Brazilian Market owner Gislene Gontijo grew up in southeastern Brazil on a small farm, where her family kept chickens and pigs. Her mother started teaching her how to cook at age 7, and she has been interested in food ever since. After successfully selling everything from beans, rice and coffee to Brazilian hair products and cologne to customers who are “90 percent Brazilian," Gontijo plans to expand from the market's current 2,000-square-foot location to a new 20,000-square-foot space nearby in Goose Creek.

Boom & Balance

Sky Market is located across the railroad tracks from these destinations at 115 South Goose Creek Blvd. Those who enter the pristinely landscaped white brick building will find an assortment of beef that, like Sky Market’s burgers, is butchered in-house.

Guests can request their cut of meat or order one of the options displayed in a glass case, including wagyu and picanha, a popular Brazilian cut that has a texture similar to sirloin steak. Sausages — seasoned with garlic, olive oil and salt — are made to withstand the heat of the grill, and meatballs are formed into large rounds and sold in packs of 12 to 15.

Freezers are filled with more meat and whole fish like traira, a freshwater species found in the rivers of Brazil. A sweets refrigerator is stuffed to the brim with massive Nutella, coconut and peanut butter popsicles. All this is in addition to the many other Brazilian snacks and goods that line the market’s shelves. Patrons can even transfer money to Brazil at Sky Market.

Sky Market isn't just a business, Abrantes said, though it is a wonderful place to enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner.

This Goose Creek establishment was built around the idea of helping members of the Brazilian community acclimate to their new surroundings.

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