Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Jamestown, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Jamestown, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

Service Areas

 Eye Surgeon Jamestown, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

 Eye Doctor Jamestown, SC

What is an Ophthalmologist in Jamestown, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Jamestown, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Jamestown, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Jamestown, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Jamestown, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Jamestown, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Jamestown, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Jamestown, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

num-list-one

Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

num-list-one

Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

num-list-one

Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Jamestown, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

Free Consultation

Latest News in Jamestown, SC

Our Family History: The Story of Jamestown

FLORENCE COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - South Carolina is full of southern history that is seeped into the soil from the Grand Strand to the Lowcountry and over to the Upstate.However, in Jamestown, a small community nestled in Florence County, a family meets every year to celebrate more than just a reunion.The James family meets on several acres of land dating back to the 1870s and their family’s patriarch, Ervin James.“Shortly after slavery, five years, Ervin James did not want to be a tenet farmer or sharecropper,&...

FLORENCE COUNTY, S.C. (WMBF) - South Carolina is full of southern history that is seeped into the soil from the Grand Strand to the Lowcountry and over to the Upstate.

However, in Jamestown, a small community nestled in Florence County, a family meets every year to celebrate more than just a reunion.

The James family meets on several acres of land dating back to the 1870s and their family’s patriarch, Ervin James.

“Shortly after slavery, five years, Ervin James did not want to be a tenet farmer or sharecropper,” Terry James said. “He wanted his own land to have true freedom.”

Ervin James is Terry’s great-great-great grandfather.

He said he isn’t sure where Ervin got the money following the Civil War, but somehow, he bought a few acres from a white man named Eli McKissick.

“Can you imagine standing around former people who used to own you,” Terry James said. “[To] own people like you and you’re with them buying stuff. I said this dude was amazing.”

The beauty of it all, Ervin James was just getting started.

Plank by plank, he built wooden homes that still stand today, fostered a self-sustained community and maintained a safe haven for Black South Carolinians.

“You had several of these,” Terry James said pointing to an old home. “It’s like 22 of them of these cabins stretched all over this place. This is just one of them and everything was grown here.”

It’s that pride that encourages the James family and friends alike to return to Jamestown every year for a celebration.

From the artistry of craftsmanship to the styling of woodwork and the soul of original outdoor cooking, it’s all an appreciation of Ervin James and the legacy he left behind and a promise to never let it go.

“As his descendants, we have an assignment to make sure Jamestown not only survive but to thrive,” Terry James said. “No selling around here. None, zero, zilch.”

As Terry James uncovered more of his family’s history, he discovered a connection unlike anything he’d ever imagined.

“I like connecting the dots and that was an important dot,” he said.

“When you dig and dig and you can’t find anything and you hit walls and then someone comes and knocks your wall down,” Helen Thompson said. “It was [amazing].”

The James-McKissick Connection

As the James family dug into their history, they ended up finding the family who sold them their prized possession.

While they searched for their family history in Florence County, Helen Thompson was tirelessly and exhaustingly trying to find her own.

“Some of the original records are just illegible,” Thompson said. “When I first started genealogy I was asking my dad about his family and all he would ever tell me is that his grandfather was a methodist preacher named Eli McKissick.”

With little information, Thompson turned to government records.

“The McKissick name, I wanted to take it as far back as I could,” Thompson said.

So, she went digging, both near and far with all hands on deck.

“Back before the internet, I just went to archives and libraries,” Thompson said. “I was traveling to Greenwood, Harleyville, different places. It was pretty tedious; I drug the kids around doing all of that.”

Through her research, Thompson traced her family tree from back to her great-grandfather until her phone rang.

“I got a call from Terry James,” she recalled. “I was so excited. I couldn’t believe it.”

“When I met her, I could feel a sigh of relief,” Terry James said.

On the other side of the phone, James had quite the story connecting their grandfathers.

“Eli McKissick, in my research, bought 300 acres for $500 plus,” James said. “But he sold a portion of that land to Ervin James for $700.”

Facing backlash from the sale following the Civil War, McKissick fled to Georgia while Ervin James stayed put, named this property “Jamestown,” and created a self-sustained Black community that’s still family-owned today.

Following their emotional hour–long conversation, Terry James extended a southern invitation for Thompson to come to his annual family reunion.

“It was real exciting,” Thompson said. “I had to go see it. I had to go see that property.”

“She just looked around and she started crying,” Terry James recalled. “It was emotional for me too.”

And what she saw blew her mind.

“Just knowing that that family is carrying this thing on generation after generation just means so much,” Thompson said. “They’ve not let the history drop, they wanted to pass it on through generations and it’s just incredible.”

While no census document will ever reveal the deal behind their grandfathers’ 1870s agreement, both James and Thompson are assured their family history will be connected forever.

“I don’t know his motive,” Thompson said speaking of her great-great-grandfather. “But yet what came out of that is just great.”

“90 or 100-something years later we found each other,” James said.

The beauty of Jamestown and its story will live on forever as it sits on the National Register of Historic Places.

Visit the Jamestown Foundation to learn more about upcoming events and to learn if you may be a part of the James family heritage.

Copyright 2023 WMBF. All rights reserved.

L/L-M boys' hoops finish seventh, Sargent County finish fifth

MINOT, N.D. — The LaMoure/Litchville-Marion boys’ basketball team ended their season with a win as they got a 59-55 win over Edgeley/Kulm-Montpelier in the seventh-place game of the 2024 NDHSAA State tournament on Saturday, March 16, at the Minot State Dome.The Rebels (21-7) got out to a quick 6-2 lead and were able to push it out to 18-12 in the second quarter. The Loboes (17-12) fought back to take a 27-24 lead on a Max Musland three and were able to stretch it out to 33-30 heading into the half.The Rebels outscor...

MINOT, N.D. — The LaMoure/Litchville-Marion boys’ basketball team ended their season with a win as they got a 59-55 win over Edgeley/Kulm-Montpelier in the seventh-place game of the 2024 NDHSAA State tournament on Saturday, March 16, at the Minot State Dome.

The Rebels (21-7) got out to a quick 6-2 lead and were able to push it out to 18-12 in the second quarter. The Loboes (17-12) fought back to take a 27-24 lead on a Max Musland three and were able to stretch it out to 33-30 heading into the half.

The Rebels outscored the Loboes 14-9 in the third quarter to take a 44-42 lead but the Loboes outscored the Rebels 17-11 in the fourth to get the four-point win.

The Rebels were led by Jacob Nitschke’s 19 points. The Loboes were led by Max Musland’s 36 points.

L/L-M 59, E/K-M 55

L/L-M: 12 21 9 17–59

E/K-M: 18 12 14 11—55

Points leaders:

L/L-M: Max Musland 36, Brayan Karlgaard 8, Blase Isaacson 7

E/K-M: Jacob Nitschke 19, Austin Strobel 13, Zeke Barnick 9

Assists leaders:

L/L-M: Isaacson 3, Musland 2, Gunner Thielges 2, Owen Lesko 1, Wyatt Miller 1, Karlgaard 1

E/K-M: J. Nitschke 5, Barnick 3, Joe Kramlich 3, Brad Kinzler 1, Strobel 1, Brogan Young 1, Drew Nitschke 1

Leading rebounders:

L/L-M: Musland 11, Lesko 5, Thielges 5, Karlgaard 3

E/K-M: Strobel 7, J. Nitschke 4, Kramlich 3

Sargent County beats Our Redeemer’s

The Sargent County boys’ basketball team withstood a fourth-quarter rally attempt from Our Redeemer’s to get a 67-65 win in the fifth-place game of the NDHSAA state tournament.

The Bulldogs led for 21 minutes and two seconds, while the Knights led for 8 minutes and five seconds.

The Bulldogs (21-7) leading scorer was Luke Martinson with 15 points. The Knights' (19-10) leading scorer was Nolan Schmidt with 21 points.

SC 67, ORCS 65

SC: 20 12 21 14–67

ORCS: 19 15 11 20–65

Points leaders:

SC: Luke Martinson 15, Grady Wehlander 14, Nicholas Hansen 13

ORCS: Nolan Schmidt 21, Payten Lindbo 14, Jace Weekley 11

Assists leaders:

SC: Hansen 3, Josh Wittich 2, Martinson 1, Kolten Kadoun 1

ORCS: Weekley 5, Schmidt 3, Weekley 1, Gus Engelhard 1

Leading rebounders:

SC: Wittich 12, Kadoun 5, Martinson 4, Hansen 4, Wehlander 2

ORCS: Schmidt 7, Ebay 7, Lindbo 4, Engelhard 3

In our fiber: Berkeley County wool plant shows textile industry’s persistence

In fact, the entire massive warehouse smells of lanolin — an earthy, comforting, animal smell, like putting your face in the fur of your favorite dog.Goodwin’s job is one of the first steps in processing greasy wool, as they call it here, into the gleaming white combed wool, called “wool top,” that is the Chargeurs Wool USA factory’s main product. Wool top is used by spinning mills, many of them based in the Southeast, to spin worsted yarn used in military coats and specialty athletic socks.With Pr...

In fact, the entire massive warehouse smells of lanolin — an earthy, comforting, animal smell, like putting your face in the fur of your favorite dog.

Goodwin’s job is one of the first steps in processing greasy wool, as they call it here, into the gleaming white combed wool, called “wool top,” that is the Chargeurs Wool USA factory’s main product. Wool top is used by spinning mills, many of them based in the Southeast, to spin worsted yarn used in military coats and specialty athletic socks.

With President Donald Trump talking about bringing back American manufacturing, some companies are looking for ways to curb or end their foreign manufacturing operations — and it’s throwing attention on longtime U.S.-based manufacturing like Chargeurs.

“More and more, customers are interested in everything to be made in America,” says Diego Paullier, Chargeurs Wool USA’s managing director and president. “American wool — they can give that a value, an additional value.”

The military is a key customer. One industry expert wrote in a trade journal that the military will buy 60 different items made from wool in 2017, from Army berets to Navy pea coats — 50,000 this year alone — to Air Force dress uniforms. The wool that goes into many of those items will be scoured and combed at Chargeurs.

This huge factory in Jamestown — a tiny town in upper Berkeley County, about an hour from Charleston — processes up to 50 percent of the roughly 26 million pounds of wool shorn from U.S. sheep in any given year. Opened in 1955, it’s the only remaining wool top-making facility in the country.

It’s a throwback in some ways: a reminder of when textile manufacturing was king in South Carolina and mills dotted the state, before the industry largely moved overseas. This isn’t a shiny, modern, highly technical plant like Boeing’s in North Charleston or BMW’s in Greer. Wooly lint clings to every machine and beam. The machines are decades old.

The plant is part of the future, too.

The cheaper cost of automation these days means American manufacturing is starting to be competitive again, says Mark Ferguson, department chair for the management science department at the University of South Carolina.

“It was happening before Trump,” Ferguson says. “I think it’s happening more than most people probably realize. The reason that’s going under-noticed is the manufacturing that’s coming back is not requiring the number of jobs or providing the number of jobs that we historically associate with it.”

That’s true at Chargeurs, where about 60 employees work, spread out over three eight-hour shifts Monday through Friday.

Wool is an old-school fiber — but it’s used these days in technical clothing, like outdoor and military gear. It absorbs liquid without feeling damp or losing its insulating value, which means it wicks sweat and keeps people warm in tough conditions. It’s also antimicrobial, so it doesn’t have to be washed as often.

Federal data shows U.S. wool production has been stable over the past five years, though it dropped in the decade before that.

Overall, the textile industry has become specialized, dealing in fancier fibers and products — think body armor, “smart” fabrics and, actually, wool.

In the wool prep area at Chargeurs’ Jamestown plant, Goodwin feeds wool into the mouth of a large machine.

“He has to follow a recipe — you know, it’s like making a cake,” says Paullier. “You have different components — the sugar, the flour. Here it’s a little bit like that. We blend wools from different states. All wools have a little bit of a difference. One’s longer, one’s whiter.”

Next, the raw wool is tumbled and tossed together in a machine.

This is also the first step in removing the massive amounts of dirt and vegetable matter that sheep accumulate through the business of being sheep. There’s dirt everywhere, being shaken out of the fleeces and removed from the machine on conveyor belts.

The wool is then fed automatically into an enormous washer. The scouring machine is at least 100 feet long and high as a house. Ominous plumes of steam shoot up all over.

Chargeurs saves the lanolin it removes from the fleeces during the washing process. It’s valuable, making its way into cosmetics and more — and it also makes it easier to clean the wastewater if it’s not full of grease.

The chief reason the Chargeurs plant sits on 550 acres of land in a mostly rural area near S.C. Highway 41 is that it has its own wastewater facility for cleaning the masses of dirty water it creates — and wastewater treatment requires lots of space.

After scouring, the wool is dried, then fed through overhead pipes to a series of machines that brush and straighten the wool. Combing will remove still more vegetable matter, neps (little blobs of wool, also called entanglements) and noils (pieces of short fiber).

The combing also makes all the fibers lay parallel to each other. That’s what makes it wool top rather than just carded wool: It’s smooth, ready to be spun into plied yarn.

Meanwhile, the cleaned, dried and combed wool is coiled up into 100-pound balls and shipped to the customer. Chargeurs, a subsidiary of a French company, occasionally imports or exports something, but most of what it sells is to nearby textile mills.

One of the places Chargeurs ships its wool top is just a few hours up the road.

Kentwool was founded in 1843 in Philadelphia — and it’s now based in Greenville, where it employs fewer than 100 people.

Kentwool takes wool top from Chargeurs, combines it with nylon, and spins it into fine yarn. The yarn is then sent to other U.S. companies that knit it into socks. While it has several divisions, Kentwool specializes in performance golf socks — the kind sold at high-end pro shops.

Keith Horn, president of Kentwool, says the company succeeds because it’s not competing directly against overseas production. It’s a different kind of product.

“That’s sort of a misnomer, to compete,” he says. “We’re not looking to put out a run-of-the-mill product, just cheap. We want to make a product that’s top of the line, that fits a niche market.

“You can go buy stuff cheap all day long,” Horn says, “but sometimes you get what you pay for.”

Jamestown Breaks Ground on 79-Acre Navy Yard Redevelopment Project in North Charleston

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — Jamestown, along with local real estate developers Weaver Capital Partners and WECCO Development, has broken ground on the first buildings at Navy Yard Charleston, the 79-acre mixed-use redevelopment of a former naval base in North Charleston.This first phase of the redevelopment involves converting two historic storehouses — Storehouse 8 and Storehouse 9 — on the project site into a total of 107,000 square feet of mixed-use space for restaurants, retail, office space and apartments. The buil...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. — Jamestown, along with local real estate developers Weaver Capital Partners and WECCO Development, has broken ground on the first buildings at Navy Yard Charleston, the 79-acre mixed-use redevelopment of a former naval base in North Charleston.

This first phase of the redevelopment involves converting two historic storehouses — Storehouse 8 and Storehouse 9 — on the project site into a total of 107,000 square feet of mixed-use space for restaurants, retail, office space and apartments. The buildings are scheduled to open in 2024.

The 40,000-square-foot, two-story building known as Storehouse 8 will be restored and repurposed as a restaurant, event space and offices. To preserve the history and character of the building, which was constructed in 1906 as naval administrative offices, the renovation will salvage architectural details such as the original hallways, trim, railings, flooring, slate roof and copper soffits.

The adjacent Storehouse 9, a 67,000-square-foot, four-story building constructed in 1918 as naval administration offices and storage facility, will be converted into restaurant and retail space on the ground floor, a rooftop bar and restaurant with views of the Cooper River and 86 multifamily units offering flexible live/work layouts.

In addition to the redevelopment of Storehouses 8 and 9, this phase of the project also includes the construction of a new restaurant space to be known as Storehouse 8.5 within the plaza between the buildings. The plaza will be amenitized as a community gathering place and include outdoor dining space, event lawn and game area.

Navy Yard Charleston joins a number of historic naval yards across the nation that have recently been reimagined and repurposed for modern use, including the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Navy Yard, Philadelphia. The multi-phase redevelopment, first announced in 2021, will transform the campus into a mixed-use neighborhood.

Since announcing the Navy Yard Charleston project, the development team has partnered with neighborhood organizations and community groups, including Charleston Promise Neighborhood and Historic Charleston Foundation. A neighborhood employment program reserving project-specific positions for local residents will be launched as part of the redevelopment of the Navy Hospital, expected to commence this year.

Navy Yard Charleston began as a working dry dock in 1901, maintaining a naval presence in North Charleston until it was decommissioned in 1996. Today, the site includes the former Navy Hospital, a neoclassical power plant, naval infirmary, and a series of storehouses.

— Kari Lloyd

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.