Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Reevesville, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Reevesville, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

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 Eye Surgeon Reevesville, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

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What is an Ophthalmologist in Reevesville, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Reevesville, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Reevesville, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Reevesville, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Reevesville, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Reevesville, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Reevesville, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Reevesville, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

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Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

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Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

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Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Reevesville, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

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With farmland rapidly disappearing to sprawl, SC legislators advance conservation option

But he and his business partner are regularly approached by developers, both in person and through the mail, wanting to buy them out. And since they own some acreage and lease others, even if they continue refusing to sell, there's still worry of losing their farmland.It's a scenario playing out across South Carolina as congestion in the nation's third-fastest-growing state keeps spreading and wide flat fields become increasingly attractive for new tract housing....

But he and his business partner are regularly approached by developers, both in person and through the mail, wanting to buy them out. And since they own some acreage and lease others, even if they continue refusing to sell, there's still worry of losing their farmland.

It's a scenario playing out across South Carolina as congestion in the nation's third-fastest-growing state keeps spreading and wide flat fields become increasingly attractive for new tract housing.

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"Development used to be in the back of everybody's mind. Now it's in the forefront," Judy, who's at least a fourth-generation farmer in Dorchester County, said of farmers across the state.

And while he doesn't mind people moving his way, per se, "they're taking up farmland as they come," he said.

He calls a Statehouse proposal steps away from becoming law a "godsend to keep the family farms in the state running."

The bill, which the House of Representatives passed 104-2 last month, would create a Working Farmland Protection Fund within the South Carolina Conservation Bank specifically to preserve agricultural land.

South Carolina lost more than 1,000 farms between 1997 and 2017, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Acreage lost to development from 2001 to 2016 totaled more than 280,000 acres, according to a 2022 report by American Farmland Trust titled "Farms Under Threat," which gave South Carolina the nation's eighth-worst threat ranking.

"It's staggering," said the bill's main sponsor, Republican Rep. Patrick Haddon, who raises cattle, pigs and poultry on about 50 acres he leases in Greenville.

Legislators of both parties say the situation has only worsened in the last few years, including in ripe farmlands such as Calhoun and Orangeburg counties where people are getting bombarded by offers.

"Farmers in places I'd never dreamed it would happen," said Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, chairman of the Fish Game and Forestry Committee.

Due to traffic congestion, "people are realizing it's quicker to buy a house in Orangeburg and go east on I-26 to the Nexton area, than to live on James Island and get to Nexton," even though it's twice the distance, he said. "Farmers are sincerely concerned about that, as they should be."

To ensure money isn't siphoned away from the Conservation Bank's existing mission of preserving significant natural resources and historic properties, the bill as amended by senators would reinstate a dedicated funding stream to the bank that legislators repealed five years ago: giving 25 cents of every $1.30 the state collects in deed-recording fees from property sales. Once historic funding levels are met, additional money allocated through the state budget would go toward farmland protection.

To be eligible for a conservation grant, the property owner must get at least 50 percent of his income from farming the land.

"If we don't commit dollars to conservation and do it in a really cost-effective way, we could end up looking like states people are fleeing because the quality of life has been destroyed," said Campsen, who authored legislation creating the Conservation Bank 21 years ago and has been pushing to reinstate a dedicated funding source instead of just relying on annual budget negotiations.

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This fiscal year, legislators allocated $37 million to the Conservation Bank. For the year that starts July 1, the House proposes sending the bank $30 million, while the Senate proposes again sending $37 million. Last fiscal year, a quarter from all deed recording fees collected by the state would've equaled $30 million.

It's Campsen's amendment to the working farmland bill, which renewed the dedicated fee, that senators advanced April 13 to the floor and is expected to pass with widespread support whenever they get to it.

Haddon supports the changes, indicating easy agreement between the chambers to send the amended bill to Gov. Henry McMaster's desk. McMaster, who has urged legislators to make bigger strides in preserving land for future South Carolinians, is expected to sign it.

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The bill is designed to provide another option for people who don't want to sell their farmland but are feeling pressured to do so — both directly from developers offering big money and indirectly as encroaching development makes farming more challenging, Haddon said.

Homeowners who move next door to a working farm may have some idealized, bucolic view of rural life without expecting the reality of the smells, noise and spraying of herbicides and insecticides that comes with it. That inevitably leads to disputes and pressure on the landowner to sell, said Rep. Russell Ott, whose family farms corn and cotton on about 2,300 acres in Calhoun County, most of which is leased.

Supporters of the bill recognize that a state grant in exchange for preserving the land for agriculture in perpetuity can't come close to the tens of millions developers can offer. But they believe the voluntary program — which also comes with tax breaks and can leverage state dollars to secure other sources such as federal agriculture grants — will appeal to farmers looking to preserve their way of life for future generations.

"Is it something that's going to completely do away with the problem of urban sprawl and conflicting land uses? No," Ott said. "But it's a start for giving property owners who need revenue and have land attractive to developers. Maybe by putting it in an easement, it gets you to where you need to be without needing to sell it."

The Conservation Bank already can and has preserved farmland. Over the past two decades, about 28,000 acres with some level of farming have been preserved, said Raleigh West, the bank's executive director.

But he expects the additional grant money to sweeten the pot and lead to more farmers seeking an easement.

The bill would also change the criteria for ranking applications for a working farmland grant, notably not including a public access component, potentially allowing more farmland to qualify for available funding.

Also aiding the effort is South Carolina Farm Bureau's creation of a nonprofit land trust to serve as the intermediary between willing landowners, other nonprofits and the Conservation Bank.

Farmers who might otherwise be uneasy about committing to a forever deal will trust the Farm Bureau to oversee their easement, assured future generations won't be restricted in ways that makes farming difficult for them, Campsen said.

"That's just normal," he said. "They'll feel more comfortable with the people they know is one of them and always will be. That really is a factor."

Ott said the hope is that legislation like Haddon's will help stop the domino effect of South Carolina losing farm after farm.

"Once you pave that parking lot over that land or you build that house, you're not coming back from that," he said. "That acreage is gone, and God only made so much dirt, so when it's gone, it's gone."

A look into “the most exclusive club in Columbia”

The first Monday of every month a group of men gather after hours in a dimly lit coffee shop in Columbia’s historic Cottontown neighborhood. They’re drinking something a little stronger than coffee though.“This is the most exclusive club in Columbia — so welcome,” Michael DeVita tells visitors. DeVita is the founder of Cola Whiskey Club.He looks around at the group of nearly 25 men, members and guests, and explains to the newcomers the informal rules of the club.“This is a place for du...

The first Monday of every month a group of men gather after hours in a dimly lit coffee shop in Columbia’s historic Cottontown neighborhood. They’re drinking something a little stronger than coffee though.

“This is the most exclusive club in Columbia — so welcome,” Michael DeVita tells visitors. DeVita is the founder of Cola Whiskey Club.

He looks around at the group of nearly 25 men, members and guests, and explains to the newcomers the informal rules of the club.

“This is a place for dudes just to be dudes.”

Cola Whiskey Club started in DeVita’s backyard a few years ago. The group formalized nearly a year ago and has more than 20 paying members now.

“Sometimes it would get rowdy, sometimes it wouldn’t; we didn’t really have a bunch of rules,” DeVita says. “It was fun, but it wasn’t exactly what I had pictured.”

Tonight, it’s a little different. The men sit around a length of wooden tables they’ve pushed together at Indah Coffee, a coffee roaster planted in an industrial section north of Elmwood Avenue. In front of each member’s place, a handcrafted, wooden flight tray is arranged with tasting glasses.

DeVita is seated near the middle of the group with five bottles of whiskey carefully arranged in front of him.

Three of the bottles DeVita brought with him, two of them were supplied by other members. On this night, they have a bottle created by actor Matthew McConaughey, a limited release of Maker’s Mark, a bottle of Old Forester Single Barrel Bourbon, a bottle of Belle Meade Cask Strength Reserve Bourbon and a once per year release from a Utah’s High West Distillery called Yippee Ki-Yay.

Dave Crossland says buying better whiskies like these is one reason the club has formalized and has members pay dues.

Crossland helped DeVita start Cola Whiskey Club. He was a part of the original gatherings in DeVita’s backyard. They weren’t just drinking whiskey then.

“We were meeting once a week. One week we’d do whiskey, the next week we’d do beer and so I was on the beer side of it,” Crossland says.

He had a home brew kit and was making his own beer. The group would grab a six pack of a craft beer and sip on it. Crossland says once the group really got into whiskies, he realized that he favored whiskey more than beer.

Crossland contributed the bottle of Belle Meade to the gathering. As is tradition, he takes the bottle he brought, tells a little of the backstory of the whiskey and why he brought it, opens the bottle and passes it around.

The men make a toast and take a swig.

At the end of the table in a dark corner, wearing a ball cap and a Cola Whiskey Club T-shirt, Nick Hauser takes his sip. He looks around at the men on his end of the table and takes another. He likes it. It will turn out to be his favorite whiskey of the night.

Hauser is the owner of Indah Coffee. He can’t recall where he met DeVita, but he said they began talking about coffee, which led to whiskey.

Hauser is attracted to finding out why he likes different flavors. He likes to reflect and think about what makes one thing stand out from another.

“I think it’s really enjoyable to kind of slow down — it’s been a busy day today — and kind of think on what are some of the little details that make an experience great,” Hauser says.

He loves the exercise of sensory analysis, scientifically unpacking the tastes he experiences. He compares it to working out. He said you get more tuned in when you pay attention to little things and dive into something.

As the club moves to sampling a bottle of Maker’s Mark’s 2019 limited release Wood Finishing Series, Hauser breaks out a stave from a barrel of Jack Daniel’s for the club to smell. Staves are the thin pieces of wood that form a whiskey barrel. The verdict from the table is that it smells like burnt wood.

Making the connection between coffee and whiskey isn’t exclusive to Hauser. Will Unthank, a newcomer to whiskey, said the two taste experiences are very similar.

Unthank joined Cola Whiskey Club because he was invited by Hauser. He attended one of the club’s first official meetings and was hooked on the camaraderie, but he couldn’t taste flavors in the whiskey.

“All I tasted was alcohol,” Unthank says.

Unthank started drinking coffee in his senior year at Erskine College.

“When I first tasted coffee it made me awake,” Unthank recalls. “It took me a little while to start tasting the underlying flavors of coffee and it was very similar to whiskey.”

As the men sip, different conversations pop up along the table. Their conversations are about the whiskey, about work and about life.

There’s a cop speaking with a preacher, a coffee shop owner having a conversation with a paper mill worker and a real estate agent talking to a medical student. Most of the men are around 30, but some are much older and some are much younger. They’re all whiskey drinkers together.

“It’s turned into a great outlet for guys to come and hang out and meet new people and network and be with a group of guys they’re not typically around,” DeVita says.

Matt Torchia joined Cola Whiskey club at the launch of the formal club. He said DeVita reached out to him and he latched on.

“I kind of took it as an opportunity to really kind of meet new people because it’s easy to stay in your clique I guess you could say and it’s hard for people to branch out,” Torchia says. “That’s really why I kind of came along.”

Torchia got into whiskey because of his mom. After he and his siblings were adults and out of the house, his parents started giving bottles as gifts. Torchia says he uses what he learns in whiskey club as a way to connect to his family. He shares his experiences in the club with them.

Torchia and DeVita share a passion for finding new whiskies. They take great joy in hunting down something new, interesting or hard to find. Torchia doesn’t dismiss the quality of familiar brands.

“Some of my favorite whiskies are ones you can pull of the shelf any day of the week,” Torchia says. “There’s a lot of just really good whiskies out there; don’t be afraid to go through and try a lot of stuff.”

As the night rolls on, the men enjoy their drinks and turn their attention back to the center of the table.

DeVita reads a review of the whiskey they’ve just tried and speaks of the flavors the distiller says are in the whiskey. They exchange small fist bumps and celebrate those around the table who tasted what the description says they should taste. DeVita tells the score of the drink from different whiskey reviewers, then they move to the next bottle.

DeVita said he doesn’t quite know what’s next for Cola Whiskey Club. He said the club is growing by a member or two each month. The club has remained invite-only — a member can invite a guest — so that they’re able to manage their growth. DeVita believes that Cola Whiskey Club could be a force in the future.

“A particular goal I have is that it would be around a long time and it would become kind of a staple of Columbia,” DeVita said.

As the night wears down, the men go around the table one-by-one and describe their favorite drink of the evening. They pour themselves another taste from their favorite bottles, clink their glasses, and enjoy one last drink.

Cola Whiskey Club member Will Unthank, left, fell in love with the Limited Release Wood Finishing Series made by Maker’s Mark. Club founder Michael DeVita tells him Maker’s Mark released this series in October of 2019 nation-wide. Only 255 barrels of this bourbon was produced.

As Cola Whiskey Club samples Maker’s Marks’ brand new Wood Finishing Series, club members break out a stave from a barrel of Jack Daniel’s to smell. Club founder Michael DeVita takes the first whiff. This edition of Maker’s Mark puts staves inside of the barrel to enhance the flavor during the aging process.

Cities with the fastest growing home prices in Charleston, South Carolina metro area

Cities with the fastest growing home prices in Charleston, South Carolina metro area It goes without saying that the coronavirus pandemic sparked a wave of uncertainty across myriad industries, and no other market has quite felt its impact like that of real estate.The pandemic became a driving force behind the continued real estate boom, with high demand for vacation homes and a limited supply of housing that prompted buyers and investors to bid up prices for affordable properties, causing home prices to skyrocket. Since the...

Cities with the fastest growing home prices in Charleston, South Carolina metro area

It goes without saying that the coronavirus pandemic sparked a wave of uncertainty across myriad industries, and no other market has quite felt its impact like that of real estate.

The pandemic became a driving force behind the continued real estate boom, with high demand for vacation homes and a limited supply of housing that prompted buyers and investors to bid up prices for affordable properties, causing home prices to skyrocket. Since then, increasing mortgage rates have slowed growth, with prices even declining in some places. But some areas are still seeing price jumps compared to the year before.

Stacker compiled a list of cities with the fastest-growing home prices in the Charleston-North Charleston, SC metro area using data from Zillow. Cities are ranked by 1-year price change as of May 2023. The typical home value in the United States increased over the last year by 0.9% to $346,856. Data was available for 35 cities and towns in Charleston, South Carolina.

1 / 30

Stacker

#30. Lincolnville, SC

- 1-year price change: +$4,186 (+1.4%)- 5-year price change: +$117,751 (+64.1%)- Typical home value: $301,592 (#23 most expensive city in metro)

2 / 30

Stacker

#29. Ladson, SC

- 1-year price change: +$4,194 (+1.4%)- 5-year price change: +$109,215 (+58.1%)- Typical home value: $297,225 (#24 most expensive city in metro)

3 / 30

Stacker

#28. Goose Creek, SC

- 1-year price change: +$6,871 (+2.3%)- 5-year price change: +$112,512 (+59.5%)- Typical home value: $301,733 (#22 most expensive city in metro)

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Stacker

#27. Reevesville, SC

- 1-year price change: +$7,343 (+3.7%)- 5-year price change: +$90,490 (+78.4%)- Typical home value: $205,934 (#31 most expensive city in metro)

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Stacker

#26. Awendaw, SC

- 1-year price change: +$7,558 (+1.2%)- 5-year price change: +$218,390 (+52.4%)- Typical home value: $634,778 (#8 most expensive city in metro)

6 / 30

Stacker

#25. Adams Run, SC

- 1-year price change: +$7,666 (+2.9%)- 5-year price change: +$98,183 (+57.5%)- Typical home value: $268,936 (#26 most expensive city in metro)

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Stacker

#24. Ridgeville, SC

- 1-year price change: +$8,638 (+2.5%)- 5-year price change: +$113,127 (+48.1%)- Typical home value: $348,480 (#20 most expensive city in metro)

8 / 30

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#23. Jamestown, SC

- 1-year price change: +$8,852 (+4.2%)- 5-year price change: +$86,530 (+65.5%)- Typical home value: $218,596 (#30 most expensive city in metro)

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#22. Summerville, SC

- 1-year price change: +$9,025 (+2.5%)- 5-year price change: +$125,613 (+51.5%)- Typical home value: $369,735 (#18 most expensive city in metro)

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#21. Saint Stephen, SC

- 1-year price change: +$9,368 (+5.1%)- 5-year price change: +$75,452 (+64.0%)- Typical home value: $193,311 (#33 most expensive city in metro)

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#20. Moncks Corner, SC

- 1-year price change: +$9,611 (+2.8%)- 5-year price change: +$130,085 (+59.2%)- Typical home value: $349,865 (#19 most expensive city in metro)

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#19. Cross, SC

- 1-year price change: +$9,740 (+5.1%)- 5-year price change: +$77,972 (+64.5%)- Typical home value: $198,928 (#32 most expensive city in metro)

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#18. Huger, SC

- 1-year price change: +$11,200 (+2.5%)- 5-year price change: +$176,673 (+62.0%)- Typical home value: $461,538 (#13 most expensive city in metro)

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#17. Ravenel, SC

- 1-year price change: +$12,094 (+2.5%)- 5-year price change: +$200,929 (+67.5%)- Typical home value: $498,800 (#12 most expensive city in metro)

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#16. Pineville, SC

- 1-year price change: +$13,008 (+7.6%)- 5-year price change: +$79,235 (+76.0%)- Typical home value: $183,514 (#34 most expensive city in metro)

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#15. Sullivans Island, SC

- 1-year price change: +$13,772 (+0.4%)- 5-year price change: +$1,698,571 (+97.0%)- Typical home value: $3,449,746 (#1 most expensive city in metro)

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#14. North Charleston, SC

- 1-year price change: +$15,339 (+5.6%)- 5-year price change: +$114,513 (+66.2%)- Typical home value: $287,466 (#25 most expensive city in metro)

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#13. Hanahan, SC

- 1-year price change: +$16,361 (+4.5%)- 5-year price change: +$140,730 (+59.8%)- Typical home value: $376,189 (#17 most expensive city in metro)

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#12. Pinopolis, SC

- 1-year price change: +$17,132 (+4.0%)- 5-year price change: +$145,948 (+48.3%)- Typical home value: $448,172 (#15 most expensive city in metro)

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#11. Hollywood, SC

- 1-year price change: +$18,014 (+4.1%)- 5-year price change: +$178,684 (+64.4%)- Typical home value: $456,082 (#14 most expensive city in metro)

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#10. Bonneau, SC

- 1-year price change: +$18,490 (+6.5%)- 5-year price change: +$118,677 (+64.2%)- Typical home value: $303,664 (#21 most expensive city in metro)

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#9. Edisto Beach, SC

- 1-year price change: +$19,879 (+3.3%)- 5-year price change: +$268,532 (+75.9%)- Typical home value: $622,135 (#10 most expensive city in metro)

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#8. Charleston, SC

- 1-year price change: +$20,477 (+4.2%)- 5-year price change: +$182,586 (+55.7%)- Typical home value: $510,627 (#11 most expensive city in metro)

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#7. Meggett, SC

- 1-year price change: +$21,591 (+3.2%)- 5-year price change: +$301,276 (+75.1%)- Typical home value: $702,621 (#7 most expensive city in metro)

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#6. Mount Pleasant, SC

- 1-year price change: +$27,461 (+3.9%)- 5-year price change: +$271,352 (+57.9%)- Typical home value: $739,896 (#6 most expensive city in metro)

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#5. Folly Beach, SC

- 1-year price change: +$29,553 (+2.5%)- 5-year price change: +$567,832 (+89.6%)- Typical home value: $1,201,567 (#4 most expensive city in metro)

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#4. Wadmalaw Island, SC

- 1-year price change: +$31,033 (+5.2%)- 5-year price change: +$282,345 (+81.3%)- Typical home value: $629,721 (#9 most expensive city in metro)

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#3. Isle of Palms, SC

- 1-year price change: +$46,195 (+3.4%)- 5-year price change: +$652,486 (+87.7%)- Typical home value: $1,396,580 (#3 most expensive city in metro)

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#2. Kiawah Island, SC

- 1-year price change: +$54,797 (+3.4%)- 5-year price change: +$700,098 (+71.2%)- Typical home value: $1,683,177 (#2 most expensive city in metro)

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#1. Seabrook Island, SC

- 1-year price change: +$61,297 (+8.0%)- 5-year price change: +$397,347 (+91.8%)- Typical home value: $830,300 (#5 most expensive city in metro)

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