Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Sullivans Island, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Sullivans Island, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

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 Eye Surgeon Sullivans Island, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

 Eye Doctor Sullivans Island, SC

What is an Ophthalmologist in Sullivans Island, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Sullivans Island, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Sullivans Island, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Sullivans Island, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Sullivans Island, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Sullivans Island, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Sullivans Island, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Sullivans Island, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

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Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

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Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

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Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Sullivans Island, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

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Latest News in Sullivans Island, SC

Sullivan’s Island at risk of losing water if water expense debt isn’t paid

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A yearslong dispute between Sullivan’s Island and the Charleston Water System could leave thousands of residents without water starting in July if over $600,000 in debt is not paid.As of Sept. 28, 2021, Charleston Water System claims Sullivan’s Island owes them $197,468 in billed, but unpaid, volumetric charges and $442,478 in billed but unpaid capital charges.Charleston Water says the town changed how much they paid per 1,000 gallons in 2017, even after paying the same amount ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A yearslong dispute between Sullivan’s Island and the Charleston Water System could leave thousands of residents without water starting in July if over $600,000 in debt is not paid.

As of Sept. 28, 2021, Charleston Water System claims Sullivan’s Island owes them $197,468 in billed, but unpaid, volumetric charges and $442,478 in billed but unpaid capital charges.

Charleston Water says the town changed how much they paid per 1,000 gallons in 2017, even after paying the same amount since the contract began in 1994.

They say that the paid charge went from $1.22 per 1,000 gallons to 88 cents per 1,000 gallons.

Charleston Water wrote in a January 2019 letter that “after more than 20 years, the town of Sullivan’s Island does not believe the contract requires them to pay any portion of Charleston Water’s capital expenses, a belief which has no support whatsoever of our board of commissioners or legal counsel.”

After getting a rate consultant, Charleston Water offered Sullivan’s to pay 89 cents per 1000 gallons. According to numerous letters, the island refused.

An opinion from the state Attorney General in 2019, states Sullivan’s Island does not have the authority to interpret contracts, but believes both of these parties must finish their initial term of 30 years and then they are able to terminate it if everyone is notified.

Sullivan’s Island says they disagree with this opinion and there are four unresolved topics between the two: capital charges, fire hydrants, the municipal wholesale rate as an excess demand charge and the rate formula.

Charleston Water says Sullivan’s Island has two choices: to pay all outstanding balances and they can continue to purchase water at the then-published municipal whole rate or find an alternate water source starting July 20 of this year.

In a 2021 resolution from Charleston Water, they say they discovered through this lack of payment that 18 fire hydrants were not being paid for on the island. If they’re not paid, all will be removed except for those used for water main flushing.

Starting this month, they will send out delinquent notices to DHEC, the State Fire Marshal, Sullivan’s Island residents and other state agencies on a monthly basis that the water will be shut off starting July 20 – when the 30-year contract is up – if this procedures are not followed.

In response to these letters, Andy Benke, the town administrator for Sullivan’s Island, provided this statement:

It’s disappointing that the leadership at Charleston Water System has apparently decided to ignore the confidentiality agreement put in place during the mediation of our long-standing dispute.

Years ago, CWS decided to raise our rates as if our signed contract with them did not exist.

As CWS knows, we’ve simply been continuing to pay the undisputed amount set in our long-standing, signed agreement.

We hope everyone will understand we’re standing firm on the principle that signed contracts are signed contracts. It’s the right thing to do for our citizens.

We will continue our good faith efforts to reach an appropriate agreement through mediation, or if need be, in the court.

Charleston Water claims Sullivan’s Island revised its interpretation of the 1994 agreement in 2016 and part of the dispute is whether the island should have to pay any portion of CWS’s capital expenses.

Charleston Water System says they can’t make any further comment because it’s still in legal mediation.

You can read more about the dispute below, or click here.

Attachment to 06-21-23 Contract Dispute by Live 5 News on Scribd

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Sullivan’s Island water supply could be cut off amid dispute with Charleston Water System

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — The town of Sullivan’s Island could have its water supply cut off this summer, amid a dispute with the Charleston Water System.According to a letter sent to the town from Charleston Water System (CWS) in October 2023, when Sullivan’s Island purchased 750,000 gallons per day of capacity from the Charleston Water System in 1994, it was a 30-year term which expires on July 19, 2024.The water system tells Sullivan’s Island leaders that if there is not a new contract by ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — The town of Sullivan’s Island could have its water supply cut off this summer, amid a dispute with the Charleston Water System.

According to a letter sent to the town from Charleston Water System (CWS) in October 2023, when Sullivan’s Island purchased 750,000 gallons per day of capacity from the Charleston Water System in 1994, it was a 30-year term which expires on July 19, 2024.

The water system tells Sullivan’s Island leaders that if there is not a new contract by then, service will be disconnected for the town’s 2,000 residents on July 20.

In addition, in the letter, the water system said the town has been paying $0.88 per thousand gallons of water since 2017, and calls that rate “arbitrary and unsupported by facts.”

Charleston Water System says the rate in 2017 was $0.96, and each year, there is a new projected rate for the town. For example, the rate last year was $1.53 per thousand gallons. At the end of the year, an adjusted rate was given which amounted to $1.11.

CWS also said in the letter to Sullivan’s Island that they are willing to provide water service to the town as long as it pays all outstanding amounts owed to the water system. As of February, that amount totaled $1.08 million.

In previous letters responding to Charleston Water System, Sullivan’s Island Mayor, Patrick O’Neil, said they have been paying the correct rate and that a memorandum of understanding on a rate formula was never approved.

“SI (Sullivan’s Island) has been paying the undisputed portion of the volumetric rate since 2017. SI does not owe capital charges unless SI purchases additional capacity which SI has not done.” a letter dated June 30 to CWS reads.

Sullivan’s Island leaders claim that the contract with the water system is clear that capital charges should not be charged on top of the initial capacity the town purchased in 1994. The town also adds that “because SI has not given written notice to CWS not to renew the contract, the contract will be automatically renewed for 15 years or until July 19, 2039, as set forth in the contract.”

In its October letter responding to the town, CWS CEO, Mark Cline, said CWS cannot agree to a rate formula that does not include capital charges or a perpetual term.

As of now, Sullivan’s Island and Charleston Water System are in legal remediation for the issue.

On Friday, Sullivan’s Island leaders released a statement to News 2:

“It’s disappointing that the leadership at Charleston Water System has apparently decided to ignore the confidentiality agreement put in place during the mediation of our long-standing dispute.

Years ago, CWS decided to raise our rates as if our signed contract with them did not exist.

As CWS knows, we’ve simply been continuing to pay the undisputed amount set in our long-standing, signed agreement.

We hope everyone will understand we’re standing firm on the principle that signed contracts are signed contracts. It’s the right thing to do for our citizens.

We will continue our good faith efforts to reach an appropriate agreement through mediation, or if need be, in the court.”

– Sullivan’s Island town leaders

Deputy administrator tapped for Sullivan’s Island town administrator position

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Leaders say the search is over in the hunt for a new town administrator for Sullivan’s Island after months of recruitment efforts.Current Town Administrator Andy Benke says Joseph R. “Joe” Henderson will be the newest town administrator come June.Benke first announced plans to retire in Oct. of last year after over two decades of service as town administrator for Sullivan’s Island. His announcement kicked off what officials called an extensive search for a replacement, wh...

CHARLESTON COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Leaders say the search is over in the hunt for a new town administrator for Sullivan’s Island after months of recruitment efforts.

Current Town Administrator Andy Benke says Joseph R. “Joe” Henderson will be the newest town administrator come June.

Benke first announced plans to retire in Oct. of last year after over two decades of service as town administrator for Sullivan’s Island. His announcement kicked off what officials called an extensive search for a replacement, which they say involved the vetting of 28 candidates.

The Town Council unanimously approved Henderson’s appointment to the position.

Henderson served as the director of planning and zoning for Sullivan’s Island from 2013 until 2022, when he was promoted to be the town’s deputy administrator.

Aside from experience, Henderson qualifies for the job with a number of degrees obtained from a series of South Carolina colleges and universities. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Coastal Carolina University, a Graduate Certification in urban planning from the College of Charleston and a Master of public administration from Clemson University.

He also has professional certifications include floodplain management, arboriculture and zone inspection. Before moving to Sullivan’s Island, Henderson working as the zoning administrator and the interim planning director for the city of Conway.

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil expressed gratitude for Benke’s 21 years of service before expressing his faith in Henderson.

“We were privileged to have Andy Benke serve as the Administrator since 2003 and wish him well in retirement. His efforts helped keep Sullivan’s Island a desired place to live and visit,” O’Neil said. “As Andy’s Deputy Administrator, Joe Henderson is well suited to succeed him. I am confident that the great work we have started over the past years will continue with Joe.”

Henderson himself expressed his gratefulness to the Town for picking him for the position.

“It’s an honor to continue to serve the community in the role of Town Administrator. We have exciting opportunities and challenges facing the Town in the coming years,” Henderson said. “I’m very fortunate to be supported by the Town Council and the employees who provide the public with exemplary service on all levels.”

Officials say Benke will continue to serve as town administrator until June 18 in order to guarantee a smooth transition.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

8-year-old makes effort to save trees set to be cut down on Sullivan’s Island

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- When you think of elementary-aged kids having a play date, it doesn’t normally include working to protect the environment.For a third grade...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- When you think of elementary-aged kids having a play date, it doesn’t normally include working to protect the environment.

For a third grader on Sullivan’s Island, Keegan Novak, it does.

“We have a symbiotic relationship with trees. What they breathe out we breathe in, what they breathe in we breathe out,” Keegan said.

Novak loves all things nature, especially palmetto trees.

“And they’re the state tree of South Carolina, they’re in our history,” Keegan said.

So when Keegan heard that Dominion Energy is planning to cut down over 500 trees on Sullivan’s Island to make room for power lines, it was time for him to get to work.

“He stopped a playdate with his friend, they came up with this. This sign, this is the original drawing, and he said ‘Dad we need to bring awareness about this,'” Keegan’s dad Justin said.

Justin Novak made copies of the sign and now they’re hanging on dozens of the trees on Sullivan’s Island slated to be removed.

The sign has a simple message, “Don’t cut ’em down”.

“I just hope they notice them and really think about how many trees are going to go down if we don’t stop Dominion,” Keegan said.

Justin says Keegan has always been passionate about what’s going on in the world, and it’s had an impact on his classmates.

“He’s been an example for other kids and was celebrated for his engagement on this project. We couldn’t be prouder of him,” Justin said.

The Novak family is hoping this simple gesture protects the fate of these trees, but also, that it encourages their Sullivan’s Island community to support Keegan’s cause.

“So hopefully this engages other people in the community to be aware of what’s going on and see if there are things they can do to help preserve some of these trees,” Justin said.

Dominion Energy sent us a statement on this issue saying the palmetto trees they’ve decided to cut down are fire hazards.

They said “Palmetto trees cannot be reduced in height or directionally pruned like other trees, and side trimming is not recommended as these trees quickly replace pruned fronds and seed stalks. For these trees, removal is the safest option.”

Charleston businesses cleaning up after winds, flooding cause damage

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - From West Ashley to Sullivan’s Island, businesses spent the day recuperating after heavy rains and strong winds caused them to temporarily lock their doors.Many of the exterior windows at Hay Tire Pros, off Savannah Highway, shattered, and a large part of their ceiling collapsed on the inside.Vice President Bill Sekula said that they have always expected severe storms to come through with being in Charleston, but that they have never had this much damage before.“I guess it was like a...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - From West Ashley to Sullivan’s Island, businesses spent the day recuperating after heavy rains and strong winds caused them to temporarily lock their doors.

Many of the exterior windows at Hay Tire Pros, off Savannah Highway, shattered, and a large part of their ceiling collapsed on the inside.

Vice President Bill Sekula said that they have always expected severe storms to come through with being in Charleston, but that they have never had this much damage before.

“I guess it was like a microburst or something to that effect, but apparently it was raining harder than usual and then the windows started to buckle and snapped over. These windows on the side just kind of came apart and came out of the building,” Sekula said.

Sekula said glass from the windows was even in the back part of their building which is almost 30 yards away. They had to close the business for the day and return all of their customers’ vehicles. He said the incident happened during hours of operation as employees notified him at around 8 a.m.

The next-door business, Etto Leisure Cars, a golf cart dealer, also saw significant damage. Will Harton, chief executive officer, said that part of their awning was ripped off and hit their power box causing them to lose power.

“I said ‘Oh my goodness.’ You know, you live in Charleston long enough, you know a storm is going to happen. Usually, it’s a hurricane. It’s not a microburst like this, but we will be fine and we will move on from here,” Harton said.

He added that he’s glad that all of his employees are safe and that the building and golf carts can be fixed.

First Alert Chief Meteorologist Bill Walsh said the damage could have been from a potential microburst or straight-line wind, but the National Weather Service has not yet confirmed that.

The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery on Sullivan’s Island had around two feet of water inside their restaurant. Their staff members spent the day using buckets to help get rid of the water. They said they have had flooding in the past, but never anything over a foot, so this is the worst they’ve seen.

“This morning, we lifted everything off the floor because we were expecting rain and heavy floods, but we didn’t know it was going to get this bad. So, as we were lifting things off the floor, it started coming in through the back door. Next thing you know there is water all over the place and we started getting buckets and mops and throwing water out. We’ve been throwing water out for the past three and a half hours,” employee Havannah Malan said.

She said that they have had to get their floors redone three times, and she expects the business will have to get them redone a fourth time after Saturday’s flood.

The businesses said they hope to repair the damages quickly, so they can return to normal operation as soon as possible.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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