Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Huger, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Huger, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

Service Areas

 Eye Surgeon Huger, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

 Eye Doctor Huger, SC

What is an Ophthalmologist in Huger, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Huger, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Huger, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Huger, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Huger, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Huger, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Huger, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Huger, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

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Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

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Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

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Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Huger, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

Free Consultation

Latest News in Huger, SC

Cainhoy, Huger residents warn of I-526’s impact

Cainhoy and Huger residents who have seen how I-526 has changed their communities are issuing a stark warning if the freeway is extended across Johns and James islands: If you build it, you’ll get rampant development, a traffic deluge and life-changing “culture shock.”“We have just absolutely been overwhelmed with traffic and wrecks. We now have a 24-hour vape shop” that attracts students after school, said MaeRe Chandler Skinner, a longtime resident of Cainhoy in lower Berkeley County. “It has been...

Cainhoy and Huger residents who have seen how I-526 has changed their communities are issuing a stark warning if the freeway is extended across Johns and James islands: If you build it, you’ll get rampant development, a traffic deluge and life-changing “culture shock.”

“We have just absolutely been overwhelmed with traffic and wrecks. We now have a 24-hour vape shop” that attracts students after school, said MaeRe Chandler Skinner, a longtime resident of Cainhoy in lower Berkeley County. “It has been a culture shock!”

The quaint Wando River enclave settled in the early 1720s has become nearly encircled by development since the highway called the Mark Clark Expressway opened three decades ago. The community has “more development than you can shake a stick at,” Skinner said. “There is not going to be a tree standing on Clements Ferry Road by the time [developers] get through.”

Decades from now, James and Johns islanders might voice a similar lament if an 8.5-mile southern loop to the interstate is built at a cost of $2.3 billion to connect it with the James Island Connector and the Charleston peninsula.

The S.C. General Assembly’s Joint Bond Review Committee on Dec. 5 approved $75 million in preliminary funding to the S.C. Transportation Infrastructure Bank for the first phase of the highway’s extension.

The new funding will be combined with $75 million pledged by the Charleston County Council toward the project. The decision puts taxpayers on the hook for $150 million for a road destined to alter the landscape and way of life for two Charleston County sea islands.

On Johns Island, some residents are resigned that not much can be done to stop the highway, said Cheryl Glover, lay leader of Johns Island Parish United Methodist Church on Bohicket Road. “It is hard to get folks to realize what is going to happen, if they don’t see it already happening.”

The prospect of the Mark Clark Expressway’s southern loop has laid dormant for decades but now with additional funding, Cainhoy resident Sammy Sanders warns: “Don’t do it! Don’t let it happen!”

For the sake of Johns and James islands, “I had hoped that issue wasn’t going to come back up,” he said. “When you increase the number of people, you increase the difficulties.”

Glover said development on Johns Island has already caused traffic delays, and the extended expressway might be a regrettable solution to traffic congestion.

Sanders admits, however, that having more people in the area has brought some advantages to lower Berkeley County. Cainhoy’s marina now has dry stack storage for boats, he said. “We wouldn’t have a dry stack, if we didn’t have the houses.”

A housing boom in the Huger community brought better internet connections, said community advocate Vernelle Dickerson. Nevertheless, the growth in Huger also has meant more traffic, a smelly sewage pumping station in one development along S.C. 41 near the Huger post office and an erosion of the tranquil country lifestyle, she said.

“These people [come here] from the North and West say they want county living, then they want all the amenities of city living” which fuels more commercial development, she explained.

Before and after the Mark Clark Expressway connected North Charleston with Daniel Island, community leaders attended dozens of meetings with state officials and developers.

Skinner urged residents of James and Johns islands to “come up with a game plan, attend every meeting … and say your objections.”

Dickerson said to blunt some of the downside of development communities should demand what they want.

Fred Lincoln lives in the Jack Primus community near Cainhoy on land his great-grandfather purchased after emancipation. Lincoln said before the extension comes, property owners should decide how they can take advantage of the commercial and residential growth that could follow the highway.

When land speculators offer to buy property, Lincoln advises “don’t take the fast dollar. Those people who sold property [in the Cainhoy area] if they had to rethink it, I don’t think they’d do it.”

Landowners on James and Johns islands near the path of the coming highway, Lincoln explained, should rezone their land for commercial use and consider leasing their property instead of selling it to preserve the land for the next generation.

City Paper special projects editor Herb Frazier is the author of Behind God’s Back: Gullah Memories, Cainhoy, Wando, Huger, Daniel Island, St. Thomas Island, South Carolina.

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Whopping $100M Columbia apartment project clears a hurdle with county vote. Here’s what’s planned

The Richland County Council voted Tuesday to unanimously approve financial incentives for a $100 million housing development at the former SCANA bus storage site on Huger Street.Huger Flats, previously identified by the county as Project Wichita, will take up nearly 6 acres at 1409 Huger St. across from The Nine student apartment complex, at the gateway to downtown Columbia’s Vista.The apartment development plans to include sidewalks, a pocket park and a 643-space parking garage, according to county documents.Durin...

The Richland County Council voted Tuesday to unanimously approve financial incentives for a $100 million housing development at the former SCANA bus storage site on Huger Street.

Huger Flats, previously identified by the county as Project Wichita, will take up nearly 6 acres at 1409 Huger St. across from The Nine student apartment complex, at the gateway to downtown Columbia’s Vista.

The apartment development plans to include sidewalks, a pocket park and a 643-space parking garage, according to county documents.

During the council’s first vote on incentives for the project in March, it was proposed as an $90 million investment. The updated $100 million plan makes the development one of the most expensive housing developments in the city.

The nearby CanalSide development remains the highest with over $100 million invested into apartments at the old South Carolina Penitentiary site.

The new Huger Flats location is one of the most prominent and valuable undeveloped properties in downtown. It has been empty since 2008 when SCANA tore down the old bus barn.

The land was first developed in 1902 as an SCE&G manufactured gas plant, which left coal tar as a byproduct. The apartment development plan currently estimates that required environmental remediation of the area will cost over $1 million. Other large costs include building the parking facility and modernizing and burying electric lines.

Huger Flats also plans to relocate and modernize stormwater and sewer mains, add green spaces and improve the roadway.

There is an estimated total of $22 million of public infrastructure improvements related to the development.

The project is to be developed by Atlanta-based Stratus Property Group, according to county documents. Jeff Koon, a representative from Stratus Property Group said the company is working with stakeholders in the area and is looking forward to proceeding with the project.

“It’s good to see some reinvention of the area on the way,” Koon said. “We’re looking forward to that being kind of a connecting piece between existing properties.”

As a part of the approval, the company agreed to rent apartments at a rate affordable to residents earning between 80% and 120% of the Columbia area median income.

In exchange for the company’s $100 million investment, it will get a 50% property tax break for 15 years.

There have been other attempts to redevelop the site in the past, including a 2016 pitch to build a supermarket and apartments, but none have been unsuccessful. The site sits beside another notable vacant property, the former Kline Iron and Steel Co. property at the corner of Huger and Gervais streets, where multiple development proposals also have faltered over the years.

This story was originally published July 19, 2023, 10:28 AM.

Huger-Wando residents raise concerns over roads, education and sewage

HUGER S.C. (WCSC) - People that live in the Huger-Wando community are voicing their concerns to city leaders about everything from transportation to affordable housing.Almost 200 people came to a community meeting at Cainhoy Elementary on Thursday. They say they feel overlooked when it comes to decisions regarding their area.Carl Anderson, S.C. House of Representatives District 103, says he is new to representing the Huger-Wando area and wants their requests to be fulfilled.“Berkeley County has several pots of mone...

HUGER S.C. (WCSC) - People that live in the Huger-Wando community are voicing their concerns to city leaders about everything from transportation to affordable housing.

Almost 200 people came to a community meeting at Cainhoy Elementary on Thursday. They say they feel overlooked when it comes to decisions regarding their area.

Carl Anderson, S.C. House of Representatives District 103, says he is new to representing the Huger-Wando area and wants their requests to be fulfilled.

“Berkeley County has several pots of money that we just hope would be shared across Berkeley County with every area of Berkeley County, but this area, as they said to me, they feel like they have been overlooked,” Anderson said. “So, I feel like this area needs a little bit more attention than the other areas.”

At the meeting, representatives from Berkeley County, the state’s health department and department of transportation, just to name a few, answered questions from the public.

“The funds that have come in from the federal government during this pandemic and what is going to be done with it,” Anderson said. “And we heard that only a fraction of those funds were spent. So, they want to be included in the funds that the county has so that things can get done in this area.”

Another issue brought up was the repaving of certain roads, the cost of affordable housing and overall severity of sewage and drainage problems.

One community member, Cynthia Lawrence, says she wished that the agencies could have gone into more detail with their answers.

“Well, I think the public is still a little leery about the answers that they received tonight from the agencies that were here,” Lawrence said. “We needed to go a little deeper and it just wasn’t enough time.”

Although the community members say they wish they had more time, other county and school representatives say they can answer more in-depth questions when contacted directly.

The hope is to have another meeting sometime in October, but no date has been set as of now. The organizer’s plans include inviting Berkeley County Water and Sewer so they can solve more of the sewage issues.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charlotte-based steel giant Nucor grows again with $425 million SC plant expansion

Charlotte-based Nucor Corp. is expanding again. The steel company will invest $425 million and add 50 full-time jobs at its South Carolina manufacturing facility.The news comes less than a month after Nucor said it would invest $200 million over five years on a modernization project at the same sheet and beam Berkeley County mill.Nucor’s latest expansion will add a galvanizing line to expand the manufacturin...

Charlotte-based Nucor Corp. is expanding again. The steel company will invest $425 million and add 50 full-time jobs at its South Carolina manufacturing facility.

The news comes less than a month after Nucor said it would invest $200 million over five years on a modernization project at the same sheet and beam Berkeley County mill.

Nucor’s latest expansion will add a galvanizing line to expand the manufacturing of corrosion-resistant products at the 1455 Old Hagan Ave. in Huger plant, according to a news release from S.C. Gov. Henry McMaster’s office Tuesday. Huger is near the South Carolina coast, about 30 miles north of Charleston.

It will be Nucor’s eighth wholly-owned galvanizing line, according to a company news release Tuesday. Nucor is one of the largest manufacturers of steel and steel products in North America.

The new South Carolina flat-rolled galvanizing line will have an annual capacity of about 500,000 tons and be able to produce galvanized steel up to 72 inches wide, Nucor said. The project is expected to be completed by mid-2025.

“Anytime a longtime existing industry commits to an expansion, that’s positive proof that a lot of people are doing things right,” Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb said in a statement.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved a $400,000 grant to Berkeley County to help with site preparation costs, according to McMaster’s office.

Nucor also received job development credits from South Carolina and the state’s utility provider, Santee Cooper, provided a grant to Berkeley County to help cover the costs of facility upgrades related to the expansion, according to a company news release. Nucor and Berkeley County also entered into a fee-in-lieu of tax agreement.

Nucor Steel Berkeley has 975 employees, according to the company.

Nucor’s Board of Directors also approved a galvanizing line to be constructed in the western U.S. with details to be announced later, according to the company.

Nucor Steel Berkeley is among a growing list of expansion moves by Nucor over the past year.

▪ Last month, Nucor said it will build an air separation unit to supply industrial gases to the steelmaking sheet and beam mill at the same Berkeley mill. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2024.

▪ In early August, Nucor said it is adding a $100 million melt shop to its Kingman, Arizona, bar mill. It will create 140 full-time jobs with an average salary of $85,000. The project is expected to take two years.

▪ In June, Nucor completed its $3 billion acquisition of C.H.I. Overhead Doors from KKR & Co. Inc. C.H.I. manufactures overhead door products for homes and businesses, as well as rolling steel and rubber doors for commercial and industrial customers.

Also in June, Nucor agreed to acquire Summit Utility Structures and a related company, Sovereign Steel Manufacturing, producers of metal poles and other steel structures for utility infrastructure and highway signage.

▪ In April, Nucor shared a $350 million expansion plan to add 180 jobs at its third rebar micro mill in Lexington, N.C.

The same month, Nucor said it is investing $15 million in NuScale Power, a developer of small modular reactor nuclear plants.

Nucor also acquired steel racking manufacturer Elite Storage Solutions for $75 million with locations in Monroe, Georgia; and Chandler, Arizona.

▪ In January, Nucor said it will build a $2.7 billion sheet mill in Mason County, West Virginia, with capacity to produce 3 million tons of steel each year.

▪ Last fall, Nucor said it would add a blast and prime line at its $1.7 billion steel plate mill under construction in Brandenburg, Kentucky, and create 400 jobs. The project is expected to open later this year.

▪ In August 2021, Nucor acquired two insulated metal panel brands from Cary-based Cornerstone Building Brands for $1 billion, the Observer reported. The deal added 830 employees from seven Cornerstone manufacturing sites, three offices and a product center.

This story was originally published September 28, 2022, 10:48 AM.

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