Healthy Eyes Are in Focus at the Eye Center of Charleston

Protect Your Eyes with Help from an Ophthalmologist in Grover, SC

If there's one thing that most people can agree on, it's that our human senses are extraordinary. They help us interact with the environment around us every day of our lives. Our brain processes signals from various neurons associated with our senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch to provide us with a meaningful perception of the world. The truth is, though, that we tend to take our senses for granted unless we experience a malfunction in any of them.

Humans have five senses and the same number of organs to complement those senses: a tongue to taste, a nose to smell, two ears to hear, skin for the sensation of touch, and eyes for sight. Of those senses and organs, our eyes are often considered the most essential, as they enable us to perceive up to 80% of all the impressions we encounter daily.

If other senses like taste or smell stop functioning, our eyes protect us from potential dangers. But they also help provide us with distinctly human memories. Think of all the picture-worthy moments that you have experienced over your lifetime. From seeing your baby smile or walk toward you for the first time to enjoying a memorable movie, it's safe to say that our eyes play an incredibly important role in our daily lives.

It makes sense, then, that we would want to protect our eyes and have them checked regularly to make sure they're healthy and functioning as they should. According to data by Ipsos, however, only 39% of Americans have been to an eye doctor's office in the last year. Fortunately, if you live in the Lowcountry, finding an eye doctor in Grover, SC, is easier and more convenient than ever when you visit the professionals at Eye Center of Charleston.

Service Areas

 Eye Surgeon Grover, SC

The Eye Center of Charleston Difference

Unlike some eye doctor offices in South Carolina, our team uses the most advanced technology paired with our esteemed clinical and surgical skills to precisely diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye conditions and diseases. We focus on a number of vision conditions, medical conditions, and physician services, including but not limited to:

  • Cataracts
  • Presbyopia
  • Nearsightedness
  • Farsightedness
  • Astigmatism
  • Styes
  • Diabetic Eye Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Excisional Biopsies
  • Dry Eye Syndrome
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Flashes & Floaters

It all starts with an introductory appointment with one of our experienced eye doctors, who will take as much time as needed to get to know you, learn more about your needs, and better understand the symptoms you're experiencing. Once we know the extent of your eye care needs, our doctors will provide you with an effective, efficient diagnosis and plan of action to remediate any issues you're facing.

From nuanced eye surgeries to standard eye exams, we've got you covered. In fact, we offer the latest technology in Varilux Progressives, Transitions, Crizal Anti-Reflective Lenses, Prescription Polarized Sunglasses, and Thin Lightweight Lenses. With a wide selection of frames and sunglasses, you're sure to find the glasses you need in a style you love.

 Eye Doctor Grover, SC

What is an Ophthalmologist in Grover, SC?

When people think about eye doctors, they often think about professionals who conduct eye exams and prescribe contacts. They don't realize that an ophthalmologist is different than other professionals, like optometrists. So, what is an ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a vision health professional who plays a specific role in the field of eye care. Along with optometrists and opticians, they are part of a comprehensive eye care team. However, some patients may need clarification on the similar-sounding names of these three types of eye care providers. Each one has unique skills and training for the tasks they perform. You should understand these differences so you can choose the best professional to address your vision needs.

What are the Differences Between Ophthalmologists and Other Eye Care Specialists?

Opticians, optometrists, and ophthalmologists each have a separate role in the field of eye care.

 Eye Treatment Grover, SC

Optometrists

These professionals conduct eye exams, vision tests, and can prescribe corrective lenses that help address and solve eye conditions.

 Eye Surgeon Grover, SC

Opticians

Opticians are often labeled "eye doctors," but they focus mostly on filling prescriptions for contact lenses, glasses, and sunglasses. They're also experts at repairing glasses and adjusting frames as needed.

Ophthalmologist Grover, SC

Ophthalmologists

These medical doctors treat and diagnose certain eye diseases. However, it's not uncommon for ophthalmologists to provide vision services similar to those of optometrists.

At Eye Center of Charleston, we offer patients all three eye care specialists to provide the most well-rounded, effective eye care services in Charleston and beyond.

Are Optometrists and Ophthalmologists Basically the Same?

While optometrists have a four-year Doctor of Optometry degree and can provide primary vision health care, ophthalmologists are medical doctors who have received approximately three times the education and training.

They can perform all the same services as an optometrist but can also provide treatment, including performing surgeries such as cataract removal, vision correction, and eyelid lifting. Optometrists may detect signs of eye diseases during routine eye exams but are unable to treat them, so they often refer patients to ophthalmologists at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Surgical Specialties at The Eye Center of Charleston

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Grover, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

While we serve many different types of patients with a wide variety of needs, many clients visit our eye surgeon in Grover, SC, for very specific procedures. Keep reading below to learn more about those surgeries and the conditions that necessitate an eye doctor's intervention.

In a young and healthy eye, light passes smoothly through clear ocular structures and is then focused on the retina, the light-sensitive lining inside the eye. The lens, which is a slightly flattened marble-shaped structure, helps to focus the eye. If the lens becomes cloudy, yellow, or limits the amount of light that travels through it, it is known as a cataract. Cataracts can occur at any stage of life, from birth to old age.

Some of the most common symptoms of cataracts include the following:

  • Blurry or Dim Vision
  • Lights Are Too Bright
  • Lights Give Off Halo Effect
  • Faded Colors
  • Vision at Night is Poor
  • Vision Distortion

Glaucoma is an eye disease that can cause damage to the optic nerve due to high pressure in the eye, leading to possible vision loss. Therefore, the primary focus of treatment is to control eye pressure. Early intervention is crucial in preventing severe vision loss. While most patients can avoid severe vision loss with the use of topical eye drops, some require additional treatment.

It should be noted that some patients prefer to have less dependence on eye drops. Along with medical treatment, several safe and effective procedures are available, including laser trabeculoplasty and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery. To learn more about these treatment options, talk to your eye doctor at The Eye Center of Charleston.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve. The optic nerve is responsible for sending visual information from your eye to your brain and is essential for good vision. While high pressure in your eye is often associated with optic nerve damage, glaucoma can occur even with normal eye pressure.

Although glaucoma can happen at any age, it is more prevalent in older adults and is one of the leading causes of blindness for people over the age of 60. Unfortunately, many forms of glaucoma produce no warning signs. The effect of the condition is so gradual that you may not notice a change in vision until the later stages of the disease.

That's why it's essential to have regular eye exams that include measuring your eye pressure. Early recognition of glaucoma is a very important part of that process because it can help slow down or prevent vision loss. If you have glaucoma, you will need to undergo treatment or monitoring for the rest of your life.

Some of the most common symptoms of glaucoma include the following:

  • Headaches
  • Eye Pressure & Pain
  • Low, Blurred, or Narrow Vision
  • Bloodshot Eyes
  • Nausea
  • Seeing Rainbow-Colored Haloes Around Light Sources

A pterygium is a non-cancerous growth that appears on the surface of the eye, causing blurry vision. It usually occurs in individuals who have a long history of exposure to sunlight or UV light. Should you need pterygium surgery at The Eye Center of Charleston, you can rest easy knowing that your eye doctor in Grover, SC, will be highly trained and experienced in the surgical treatment of pterygia.

Also called surfer's eye, a pterygium is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, which is a thin and clear membrane on the surface of the eye. It can appear as a fleshy growth and is usually found growing from the inner corner of the eye, close to the nose. However, it can also appear on the outer corner or on both sides of the eye. The condition is not cancerous and does not spread to any other part of the face or body. It can cause redness and irritation in the affected area.

If left untreated, a pterygium can grow across the cornea, which is the transparent 'window' that covers the pupil and iris, further impacting vision. In such cases, surgical treatment may be necessary. However, it's important to note that pterygia may grow back even after successful surgery.

Some symptoms of a pterygium include the following:

  • Itching & Burning
  • Inflammation & Bloodshot Eyes
  • Minor Eye Pain
  • Issues with Blocked Vision

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes

If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if the disease can affect your eyes and whether or not an ophthalmologist in Grover, SC can help. To provide the best answer, it's important that you understand how diabetes can affect your eyesight.

Diabetes is a condition in which your body fails to properly convert food into energy. This is because your body either cannot produce or does not respond to insulin, which is a hormone responsible for transporting glucose (blood sugar) to the cells in your body. When there is an excess of glucose in the bloodstream, it can cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves throughout your body, including the eyes.

Understanding Diabetic Eye Disease

When we refer to diabetic eye disease, we're talking about a group of eye conditions that stem from diabetes. Those conditions include the following:

3 Easy Ways to Protect Your Eyes Everyday

Eye problems can be easily prevented if you adopt some easy-to-follow habits for eye care in your daily routine. Even though these habits are practical and easy to accomplish, many people brush them off - until they have serious eye problems. To maintain good eye health and sharp vision, try incorporating these eye care techniques into your daily routine.

Eye Center of Charleston Pro Tip

Swing by one of our eye clinics to see our selection of fashionable and chic sunglasses. Our licensed opticians keep a number of popular sunglass options available at all times, like Costa, Kate Spade, and Juicy Couture. Protect your eyes and look great at the same time!

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Use Protection from the Sun

It's important to be mindful of the potential risks associated with exposure to sunlight and UV rays. These hazards include an increased risk of age-related macular degeneration, as well as the possibility of cornea sunburn or photokeratitis. To protect your eyes, try wearing sunglasses that have UV protection. If you don't like wearing sunglasses, you can opt for UV-protected eyeglasses or contact lenses instead. You can also try wearing caps, visors, and hats for added protection.

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Try Not to Rub Your Eyes

One of life's little pleasures is rubbing your eyes when you're tired or have had a long day. It may feel good, but we don't recommend doing it. Reason being, your hands come into contact with a great deal of dirt, dust, and bacteria on a daily basis.

Every time you touch or rub your eyes, these harmful particles can be easily transferred to them. If you avoid touching your eyes with your hands, you can better prevent infections and irritations.

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Try the 20-20-20 Rule of Thumb

To keep your eyes in the best shape possible, consider adopting this handy rule. It states that:

  • Look away from your computer screen or TV every 20 minutes and fixate your gaze on something that is 20 feet away.
  • Blink your eyes 20 times in succession. This helps prevent dry eyes.
  • Get up out of your seat or away from your desk every 20 minutes. Then, take 20 steps. Doing so helps you vision and also helps promote healthy blood circulation and posture.

See a Brighter Future with Help from An Eye Doctor in Grover, SC

At The Eye Center of Charleston, we're proud to offer a breadth of eye care services under one roof tailored to you and your whole family. From pediatric myopia management and treatment for dry eye to popular eyewear options and complicated eye surgery, we're ready to help. Regardless of the reason why you visit our eye care office, you can have peace of mind knowing that your patient experience will be comfortably curated for you.

Contact our eye care center today to learn more about our practice and to schedule an initial consultation with one of our expert eye doctors.

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Latest News in Grover, SC

The Debutante Club of Greenville held its 66th Annual Ball at the Poinsett Club on Dec. 28, 2022

The Debutante Club of Greenville presented 13 young women at its 66th Annual Ball at the Poinsett Club on Dec. 28, 2022.Sarah Grace Calder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Connelly Calder, junior, is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Everette Arden Weathers of Orangeburg, and Mrs. Thomas Harold DeWitt of Simpsonville and the late Mr. DeWitt. A student at Clemson University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Connor Quin Bailey.Anne Stuart Cox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert William Cox, is the grandd...

The Debutante Club of Greenville presented 13 young women at its 66th Annual Ball at the Poinsett Club on Dec. 28, 2022.

Sarah Grace Calder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Connelly Calder, junior, is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Everette Arden Weathers of Orangeburg, and Mrs. Thomas Harold DeWitt of Simpsonville and the late Mr. DeWitt. A student at Clemson University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Connor Quin Bailey.

Anne Stuart Cox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert William Cox, is the granddaughter of Mrs. James Venable Revercomb of Roanoke, Virginia, and the late Mr. Revercomb, and Mrs. William Lee Cox of Greenville and the late Mr. Cox. A student at the University of Georgia, she was presented by her father and escorted by Robert Holland Cox.

Charlotte Irene Grover, the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Austin Grover, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Charles Graham Collins, junior, of Charlotte and the late Mr. Collins, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Frank Austin Grover, formerly of Piedmont. A graduate of the University of South Carolina, she was presented by her father and escorted by Daniel Austin Grover, junior.

Bates Elizabeth Hinsdale, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Eric Hinsdale, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Robin Hope Pearce and Mr. Thomas Butler Pearce III, both of Marietta, Georgia, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Philip Rodney Hinsdale, formerly of Greenville. A student at Clemson University, she was presented by her father and escorted by William Lee Hudson.

Hilton Elizabeth McGill, the daughter of Mrs. Leigh McCall McGill and Mr. Frank Hilton McGill III, is the granddaughter of Dr. Lenora Clary McCall of Greenville and the late Mr. Arthur Crosswell McCall, junior, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hilton McGill, junior, of Kingstree. A student at the College of Charleston, she was presented by her father and escorted by Thomas Preston McMeekin.

Sarah Foster McKissick, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Powers McKissick, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Marion Porter Brawley Rose of Greenville and the late Mr. Rose, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick II, formerly of Litchfield Beach. A student at Clemson University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Jack Smith Sanford.

Reedy Buyck Newton, the daughter of The Honorable William Weston Jones Newton and Mrs. Newton of Bluffton, is the granddaughter of Mr. William Otis Buyck of Manning and the late Mrs. Buyck, and Mrs. Thomas Earle Macfie of Greenville and the late Mr. Macfie, and the late Mr. Howard Ellis Newton, junior, formerly of Greenville. A student at the University of South Carolina, she was presented by her grandmother, Mrs. Thomas Earle Macfie, introduced by her father and escorted by Jameson Powers Rogers.

Dayton Elizabeth Nuckolls, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jeremiah Nuckolls III, is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Newton Turrentine of Spartanburg, and Mrs. Ann Lowe Nuckolls of Greenville and the late Mr. Thomas Jeremiah Nuckolls, junior, formerly of Greenville. A student at Clemson University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Richard Weeks Poole.

Janie Gage Schmitt, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Brent Schmitt, is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Clyde Belcher of Greenville, and Mrs. John Davis Schmitt of Greenville and the late Mr. Schmitt. A student at Sewanee: The University of the South, she was presented by her father and escorted by John Brent Schmitt, junior.

Helen O’Dell Smith, the daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Jones Smith and Mr. Samuel Wilson Smith IV, is the granddaughter of Mrs. Edgar Eugene Jones II of Greenville and the late Dr. Jones, formerly of Mount Pleasant, and Mrs. Samuel Wilson Smith III of Greenville and the late Dr. Smith. A student at Auburn University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Samuel Wilson Smith V.

Eleanor Louise Usry, the daughter of Mrs. David Chadwick Jones and Mr. Charles Matthew Usry, is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Richardson, junior, formerly of Greenville, and Mrs. George Howard Usry of Clemson and the late Mr. Usry. A student at the College of Charleston, she was presented by her stepfather, David Chadwick Jones, and escorted by Benjamin Campbell Usry.

Sarah Elizabeth Usry, the daughter of Mrs. David Chadwick Jones and Mr. Charles Matthew Usry, is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Richardson, junior, formerly of Greenville, and Mrs. George Howard Usry of Clemson and the late Mr. Usry. A student at the University of South Carolina, she was presented by her stepfather, David Chadwick Jones, and escorted by John Timothy Corley.

Virginia Slater Weston, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Patrick Weston, is the granddaughter of Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Epps Coker of Manning, and Dr. Shannon Nelson Weston of Columbia and the late Mrs. Weston. A student at Washington and Lee University, she was presented by her father and escorted by Benton Sellers Bragg.

Officers of The Debutante Club of Greenville are Mrs. Thomas Jeremiah Nuckolls III, president; Mrs. Lynwood Breeden Hollis, junior, vice-president/president elect; Mrs. Bryson Gary Thomason, secretary; Mrs. Thomas Martin Fridy, assistant secretary; Mrs. William Bradley Chastain, treasurer; and Mrs. Edward Perry Heidtman, assistant treasurer.

Other board members are Mrs. Lance Townsend Burnett, Mrs. David Matthew Chambers, Mrs. Allison Gulledge Easterby, Mrs. David Bynum Poole, Mrs. Franklin Michael Selvy and Mrs. Timothy Shaler Smith.

Mrs. Raymond Patrick Weston is the ex-officio member of the board. Mrs. Robert Baldwin Thompson III is the advisor to the board. Mrs. Stephen Frank Cassell is the calendar chair. Mrs. Howard Lee Einstein, Mrs. Francis Watters Jackson, junior, Mrs. Jennings Gillem Pressly and Mrs. Edward Holmes Stall, junior are the historians. Mrs. Robert Connelly Calder, junior is the chairman of the Mothers’ Committee.

South Carolina man charged in connection with two Brunswick bank robberies

A South Carolina man charged in connection with a bank robbery in Calabash this week now faces charges in a separate bank robbery reported in September 2014.Grover Marcell Springs, 37, of Georgetown, South Carolina, has been charged with common law robbery in connection with a robbery at the First Community Bank at 4949 Main St. in Shallotte, just after 2:18 p.m. Sept. 17, 2014, according to town spokeswoman Rachael Johnson....

A South Carolina man charged in connection with a bank robbery in Calabash this week now faces charges in a separate bank robbery reported in September 2014.

Grover Marcell Springs, 37, of Georgetown, South Carolina, has been charged with common law robbery in connection with a robbery at the First Community Bank at 4949 Main St. in Shallotte, just after 2:18 p.m. Sept. 17, 2014, according to town spokeswoman Rachael Johnson.

Read related story: Police search for suspect in Shallotte bank robbery

Warrants state Springs is charged with stealing $2,462 from the bank.

Springs was arrested in his hometown Tuesday, charged with common law robbery in a robbery reported Monday at the PNC Bank in Calabash, according to Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Spokeswoman Emily Flax. He was booked at the Georgetown jail.

Read related story: South Carolina man arrested in connection with Calabash bank robbery

Springs faces an additional charge of second-degree kidnapping in PNC bank robbery, Flax said.

Springs was booked Wednesday at the Brunswick County Detention Facility and placed under a $250,000 secured bond.

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Lower Cape Fear Hospice will offer a free grief workshop, Realizing the future: Creating a vision board, from 1-3 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, at Phillips LifeCare & Counseling Center, 1414 Physicians Drive in Wilmington.

A vision board is a way to visually represent things participants want to achieve for the future. This is a helpful way to lay out dreams and goals. The vision board will then become the basis for words in a 2015 journal.

Participants will learn how to create their own personal journals using art materials supplied by facilitator Lorraine Perry, Lower Cape Fear Hospice bereavement counselor.

Registration is mandatory. For more information, call 796-7991. When leaving a message, please leave your name, phone number, and indicate the specific program you wish to attend. Sessions are free. Donations are appreciated. Additional groups will form throughout the year.

Lower Cape Fear Hospice is a nonprofit agency that provides healthcare and comfort to people with advanced illnesses; support and counseling to families; and education to the community in Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover, Onslow and Pender counties. For more information, visit www.lcfh.org or facebook.com/lcfhospice.

Lawyers Collective case: SC refuses to stay interim protection granted to advocates Jaising, Grover

The Supreme Court on Thursday refused to stay a Bombay High Court order directing the Central Bureau of Investigation not to take coercive steps against senior lawyers Indira Jaising and Anand Grover and their non-governmental organisation Lawyers Collective in a case related to alleged violation of Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act, Live Law reported. The CB...

The Supreme Court on Thursday refused to stay a Bombay High Court order directing the Central Bureau of Investigation not to take coercive steps against senior lawyers Indira Jaising and Anand Grover and their non-governmental organisation Lawyers Collective in a case related to alleged violation of Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Act, Live Law reported. The CBI had moved the top court last month against the interim relief granted by the High Court to the lawyers on July 25.

A Supreme Court Bench headed by Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi issued notices to the NGO, Jaising and Grover, according to ANI. In its plea, the CBI said the High Court had neither said how the FIR was “unsustainable and bad in law” nor had it ruled how it would be unlawful to continue the investigation.

Lawyers Collective is accused of irregularities in receiving foreign aid worth more than Rs 32.39 crore between 2006-’07 and 2014-’15. According to the Ministry of Home Affairs, the NGO’s FCRA registration was suspended in 2016 as its response to the allegations was not satisfactory.

The CBI’s FIR is based on a complaint by the home ministry. It has accused Jaising and Grover of misusing the funds for personal benefits. Though the ministry did not name Jaising in its complaint, it accused her of receiving remunerations worth Rs 96.6 lakh from foreign contributions made to the organisation during her tenure as India’s additional solicitor general from 2009 to 2014. The ministry alleged that her foreign travels as the government’s counsel were funded by Lawyers Collective without the ministry’s approval.

In July, the CBI searched the homes and offices of Jaising and Grover in Delhi and Mumbai. Lawyers Collective has said the FIR has “no basis in fact and in law” and has been filed to target and silence its office bearers for the cases they have taken up in the past.

Meanwhile, Justice Aniruddha Bose recused himself from hearing the matter further, reported Live Law.

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